Titania McGrath, the Wokest of the Woke

Titania McGrath, the Wokest of the Woke: A Review of Woke: A Guide to Social Justice by Titania McGrath – Quadrant

A recent episode of ABC’s Q&A boasted an all-female panel of moral delinquents, some of whom mulled, and then chirpily endorsed, a program of political violence. Mona Eltahawy, a feminist of extraordinarily limited vocabulary, banged on about white supremacy, the patriarchy, and the necessity of murdering men. When unsure of what to utter next, she added a few expletives to her misandrist waffle.

Not to be outdone, the Aboriginal activist Nayuka Gorrie favoured the approach of the smirking arsonist:

I think violence … is OK because if someone is trying to kill you, there’s no amount of, ‘Oh, but I’m really clever.’ You know, ‘I’m really articulate.’ No amount of that is going to save you. So, yeah, let’s burn stuff.

While many viewers found this confronting, my initial reaction was one of perplexity: how could anyone mistake her for an articulate or even mildly interesting person? Her Twitter profile informs the world that Ms. Gorrie, a non-binary sort of chappie, prefers the ungrammatical and nonsensical pronouns they/them. It’s rather hard to keep up nowadays. The acceptable vocabulary seems to be updated every five minutes or so, even they is able to see that (Good grief!).

How is it possible, as the kids and a number of potential leaders of the free world wonder, to stay woke? This is a very important question for Australians, too, as that Q&A episode, taken down from all ABC platforms and destined for a kind of broadcasting infamy, is a reminder that we are not exempt from the Great Awokening.

Luckily for us, Titania McGrath, the satirical Twitter creation of British comedian and writer Andrew Doyle, has written a book that Australians would greatly benefit from reading. Woke: A Guide to Social Justice serves as both a brilliantly hilarious satire of our absurd cultural moment and, in its pointed ridicule, one of the most powerful weapons we have to combat it.

Read this review at Quadrant