Minding your Language at Monash

Minding your Language at Monash – Quadrant

Pronouns are not everyone’s idea of a good time, and this is especially true of Bonnie Logan, a 23-year-old law student at Monash University. Last week, The Age drew its readers’ attention to the terrible hardship Logan has undergone while doing her pre-tutorial readings: repeated and unrelenting encounters with he and him.

Despite the fact that such pronouns are intended to be gender neutral, and such a reminder is helpfully included next to an asterisk, young Bonnie, a sensitive plant, has found it all too intolerable. To use her exact words, the whole experience with these masculine pronouns has been “deflating and disempowering.”

Read this essay at Quadrant

Young, Woke and in Need of Competition

Young, Woke and in Need of Competition – Quadrant

The trusty algorithm over at job-seeker site SEEK has recommended that I apply for the Social Justice Reporter position with Junkee Media, and I’m wondering if I should dash off a CV. The job advertisement informs me that

Junkees funny, smart, ballsy, and interesting take on news, film, politics, TV, and more has seen it develop a strong following. Junkee has a fresh take and unique attitude, and in just a few years has established itself as one of the most interesting new voices in Australian media.

There is sure to be a large pool of eager applicants, but I know how to distinguish myself. I would hasten to note that the use of gendered language like ballsy is very problematic and offensive to the trans community. As an ally, I am committed to dismantling — ah, what do the kids call it? Oh, yes — the cis-heteronormative patriarchy.

As you can see, I am well versed in the vocabulary of social justice nonsense, and I shall bang on like this in my cover letter. If I include “calling people racist” in my list of hobbies, I’ll get an interview, right?

Read this essay at Quadrant

Sally Rugg’s Memoir of Mendacity: A Review of How Powerful We Are: Behind the Scenes with One of Australia’s Leading Activists by Sally Rugg

Sally Rugg’s Memoir of Mendacity: A Review of How Powerful We Are: Behind the Scenes with One of Australia’s Leading Activists by Sally Rugg – Quadrant

A self-proclaimed ‘survivor’ and architect behind the campaign for same-sex marriage has written a book recounting how the coup was achieved. The very mistress of intersectional windbaggery, we can assume she has, alas, a bright future in this age of politics underwritten by the Left’s preference for insult, slur, harassment and ‘virtuous’ tolerance.

Read this review at Quadrant

 

Book Review: My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home by Michael Brendan Dougherty

Book Review: My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search For Home by Michael Brendan Dougherty – Sound the Sirens

This book should be read widely and thoughtfully, as both an example of outstanding memoir and, more importantly, as a political intervention: perhaps our etiolated debate over the nation and its soul can be brought back to life.

Read this review at Sound the Sirens

 

Titania McGrath, the Wokest of the Woke

Titania McGrath, the Wokest of the Woke: A Review of Woke: A Guide to Social Justice by Titania McGrath – Quadrant

A recent episode of ABC’s Q&A boasted an all-female panel of moral delinquents, some of whom mulled, and then chirpily endorsed, a program of political violence. Mona Eltahawy, a feminist of extraordinarily limited vocabulary, banged on about white supremacy, the patriarchy, and the necessity of murdering men. When unsure of what to utter next, she added a few expletives to her misandrist waffle.

Not to be outdone, the Aboriginal activist Nayuka Gorrie favoured the approach of the smirking arsonist:

I think violence … is OK because if someone is trying to kill you, there’s no amount of, ‘Oh, but I’m really clever.’ You know, ‘I’m really articulate.’ No amount of that is going to save you. So, yeah, let’s burn stuff.

While many viewers found this confronting, my initial reaction was one of perplexity: how could anyone mistake her for an articulate or even mildly interesting person? Her Twitter profile informs the world that Ms. Gorrie, a non-binary sort of chappie, prefers the ungrammatical and nonsensical pronouns they/them. It’s rather hard to keep up nowadays. The acceptable vocabulary seems to be updated every five minutes or so, even they is able to see that (Good grief!).

How is it possible, as the kids and a number of potential leaders of the free world wonder, to stay woke? This is a very important question for Australians, too, as that Q&A episode, taken down from all ABC platforms and destined for a kind of broadcasting infamy, is a reminder that we are not exempt from the Great Awokening.

Luckily for us, Titania McGrath, the satirical Twitter creation of British comedian and writer Andrew Doyle, has written a book that Australians would greatly benefit from reading. Woke: A Guide to Social Justice serves as both a brilliantly hilarious satire of our absurd cultural moment and, in its pointed ridicule, one of the most powerful weapons we have to combat it.

Read this review at Quadrant

 

A Wilderness of Queer Theorists? A Review of Titus Andronicus

A Wilderness of Queer Theorists? A Review of Titus Andronicus – Sound the Sirens

In Cormac McCarthy’s masterly novel Blood Meridian, the main antagonist, the Judge, has some dispiriting reflections on the human condition and its permanent and inflexible capacity for barbarism:

“It makes no difference what men think of war . . . War endures. As well ask men what they think of stone. War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him. The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner.”

This bleak vision of the American West and its new and old inhabitants invites comparison with Shakespeare’s Rome, “a wilderness of tigers” as Titus Andronicus calls it. His military victory over the Goths has left twenty-one of his sons dead, and now, as ever, another war awaits him: a family struggle of revenge against Tamora, her children, and those who would rule Rome.

There are some scenes in McCarthy’s novel that defy retelling or summary. Words like violent and terrifying come to seem pallid and banal when set against the depravity and real horror of McCarthy’s world. Similarly, the practitioners of war in Shakespeare’s first tragedy treat us to decapitation, filicide, dismemberment, and cannibalism. It’s difficult even to imagine Blood Meridian being filmed or staged, and directors taking on Titus Andronicus have often felt the same. A particularly gory 2014 production at the Globe Theatre in London left a few audience members collapsing and vomiting.

While Blood Meridian is undoubtedly McCarthy’s masterpiece, Shakespeare’s tragedy has almost always been considered a shameful aberration, undeserving of mention in the same breath as Hamlet or Macbeth. The scholar Harold Bloom went so far as to wish that this “poetic atrocity” had never been written in the first place. Interestingly, many modern viewers, occasionally wiser than verbose academics, have finally come to agree with Shakespeare’s Elizabethan audience, who bloody well loved it. Their hobbies, it must be noted, also included attending public hangings, so they weren’t exactly the squeamish types. Nor are we, I suppose, accustomed as we are to the daily brutality served up on TV, social media, and the news.

Can Titus Andronicus be rescued from neglect and disfavour? Bell Shakespeare’s production at the Sydney Opera House, in the hands of director Adena Jacobs, has made an audacious attempt to do so.

Read this review at Sound the Sirens

Ramsay and the Rabble: Miseducation at the University of Queensland

Ramsay and the Rabble: Miseducation at the University of Queensland – Sound The Sirens

For good reason, controversies in higher education are usually of short-term and limited interest to the Australian public, which is undoubtedly much more intelligent than anyone at a typical humanities faculty meeting. Examples abound, but for a measure of proof, look to Dr. Dean Aszkielowicz of Murdoch University, who recently expressed a chirpy contempt for ANZAC soldiers, or, as he called them, murderers unworthy of commemoration.

Fashionable whinging about a pervasive university rape crisis also comes to mind. The idea that Australian campuses are somehow comparable to the Congo or downtown Mogadishu cannot be believed by a thinking person, which is probably why it’s so popular among feminists of the young and mulish variety.

Such examples of academic mischief dominate the headlines and then disappear. The ongoing debate over the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation, however, has proven to be an interesting exception.

Read this essay at Sound the Sirens

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